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A Game of Thrones is the first book in the A Song of Ice and Fire series, an epic fantasy series by American author George R. R. Martin. It was first published on August 6, 1996. The novel was nominated for the 1998 Nebula Award and the 1997 World Fantasy Award, and won the 1997 Locus Award. The novella Blood of the Dragon, comprising Daenerys Targaryen chapters from the novel, won the 1997 Hugo Award for Best Novella.

Background and SummaryEdit

A Game of Thrones is set in the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros, a land reminiscent of medieval Europe. In Westeros, the seasons last for years, sometimes decades, at a time. 

Fifteen years prior to the novel, the Seven Kingdoms were embroiled by a civil war. Prince Rhaegar Targaryen kidnapped Lyanna Stark, arousing the ire of her family and of her betrothed, Lord Robert Baratheon (the war's titular rebel). The Mad King, Aerys II Targaryen, had Lyanna's father and eldest brother executed when they demanded her safe return. Her second brother, Eddard, joined his boyhood friend Robert Baratheon and Jon Arryn, with whom they had been fostered as children, in declaring war against the ruling Targaryen dynasty, securing the allegiances of House Tully and House Arryn through a network of dynastic marriages (Lord Eddard to Catelyn Tully and Lord Arryn to Lysa Tully). The powerful House Tyrell continued to support the king, but House Lannister and House Martell both stalled due to insults against their houses by the Targaryens.The civil war climaxed at the Battle of the Trident, where Prince Rhaegar was killed in battle by Robert Baratheon. The Lannisters finally agreed to support King Aerys, but then brutally turned against him, sacking the capital of King's Landing. Jaime Lannister of the Kingsguard betrayed and murdered King Aerys and House Lannister swore fealty to Robert Baratheon. The Tyrells and remaining loyalists surrendered and Robert Baratheon was declared king of the Seven Kingdoms. Unfortunately, during the war, Lyanna Stark had died, apparently of illness shortly after her brother captured the fortress where she'd been held captive; Robert Baratheon instead married Cersei Lannister to cement the alliance with her House. Despite Robert's victory, the Mad King's younger son Viserys and only daughter Daenerys were taken to safety across the sea by loyal retainers. After the war, House Martell chose a path of isolation, since Prince Doran's sister Elia Martell (Prince Rhaegar's wife) and her young children had been killed by knights sworn to House Lannister during the storming of the capital.

Six years later, King Robert proved his resolve by defeating a rebellion by Lord Balon Greyjoy of the Iron Islands. Balon's two eldest sons were killed and his youngest son, Theon, was taken as a political hostage and raised by Eddard Stark in Winterfell.

PlotEdit

Main Article: Chapter Summaries

A Game of Thrones follows three principal storylines as they develop a tandem with one another. The most storylines begin in the year 298 AC (After Conquest), whilst the prologue takes place in 297 AC. The story continues for many months, until 299 AC. 

In the Seven KingdomsEdit

Eddard Stark, Lord of Winterfell and Warden of the North, performs the execution of a man of the Night's Watch who has betrayed his vows and fled from the Wall. His sons Robb and Bran, his bastard Jon Snow and his ward Theon Greyjoy all attend. After the beheading, Robb finds a dead direwolf (the sigil of House Stark), killed by the antlers of a stag (the sigil of House Baratheon), which had given birth to five pups before it died. Robb and his brothers ask to keep them and Eddard consents, on the condition that the children themselves take care of them, rather than leaving the matter to the servants of House Stark. There are five pups, one for each of Eddard's trueborn children; Robb names his Grey Wind and Bran names his Summer, whilst Eddard's daughters Sansa and Arya name theirs Lady and Nymeria respectively. Eddard's youngest, Rickon, names his Shaggydog. Unexpectedly, Jon finds a sixth, much smaller, pup lying separately nearby; an albino runt with white fur and red eyes. Jon claims this one, naming it Ghost.

King Robert I Baratheon arrives at Winterfell with his court and many retainers, including his wife, Queen Cersei of House Lannister, and his children: Joffrey, Myrcella and Tommen. The queen's twin brother, Ser Jaime Lannister of the Kingsguard, and their younger brother Tyrion the Imp (so named for his dwarfism), also accompany the group. Robert asks Eddard to become the new Hand of the King after the death of the previous office holder, Lord Jon Arryn. Eddard agrees and travels south with his daughters Sansa and Arya, leaving Catelyn, Robb, Bran (now in a coma after a grevious fall from a window) and Rickon at home. Jon Snow elects to travel north to the Wall to join the Night's Watch and is joined by Tyrion, who is eager to see the fabled construction for himself.

Catelyn Stark learns from her sister Lysa Arryn (widow of the late Lord Jon Arryn) that the Lannisters had Jon Arryn murdered. After Eddard leaves for the south, an attempt is made on Bran's life, thwarted only by the direwolf Summer. Catelyn realizes that Bran must have seen something and been pushed from the window deliberately, and that the would-be murderers are trying to cover their tracks. She travels by sea to King's Landing and learns from her childhood friend Petyr "Littlefinger" Baelish that the dagger used in the assassination attempt was last seen in the hands of Tyrion Lannister. Traveling north again, Catelyn and her retainers encounter Tyrion by chance in an inn (as he returns south from the Wall) and take him captive to the Eyrie, where Lady Lysa places him on trial. Unfortunately, Tyrion chooses trial by combat and his champion, a sellsword named Bronn, wins freedom for him.

In the capital of King's Landing, Eddard investigates Jon's death and learns that Jon Arryn and King Robert's brother, Lord Stannis Baratheon, had discovered that Robert's three children are actually the products of an incestuous liasion between Queen Cersei and her twin brother, Jaime. Spurning the advice of Robert's youngest brother, Renly, to take Cersei into custody, Eddard instead offers mercy, telling Cersei to flee. King Robert dies of a mishap whilst hunting in the kingswood and Cersei's eldest son Joffrey is proclaimed king before Eddard can pass the crown to Stannis, Robert's true heir. When Eddard moves against Cersei, he is betrayed by Littlefinger. Eddard reluctantly agrees to sign a false confession of treason in return for Sansa and Arya's lives and the chance to go into exile on the Wall. Instead, Joffrey has Eddard brutally executed. While Sansa is retained in custody, Arya manages to escape with the help of her fencing instructor, Syrio Forel, and Yoren, a recruiting agent for the Night's Watch. 

A civil war, later dubbed the War of the Five Kings, erupts. Robb Stark leads an army of northmen into the Riverlands to support Lord Hoster Tully, whose forces had come under attack by Lord Tywin Lannister after Catelyn took Tyrion prisoner. Riverrun, the Riverlands capital and seat of House Tully, is besieged by an army under Jaime Lannister, whilst Lord Tywin holds a large army south of the Trident to halt Robb's advance. Unexpectedly, Robb wins the support of House Frey by agreeing to a dynastic marriage. This allows him to detach his cavalry and cross the Green Fork whilst his infantry carries on to the Trident under Lord Roose Bolton, one of Robb's bannermen. Tywin, joined by the liberated Tyrion (who has won the support of the mountain clans of the Vale) defeats the Stark force along the Green Fork before learning that Robb has outmaneuvered him. Shortly afterwards Robb's forces surprise and capture Jaime Lannister before smashing the Lannister army at the Whispering Wood north of Riverrun. Tywin falls back on the strong castle of Harrenhal and orders Tyrion to go to King's Landing and counsel King Joffrey I, acting as Hand in his stead.

Lord Renly Baratheon flees south from King's Landing to Highgarden, seat of the powerful House Tyrell, and there is declared king by acclamation, becoming the second of the war's five kings. Robb Stark becomes the third, when he is proclaimed the King in the North by the Stark and Tully bannermen present at Riverrun.

On the WallEdit

In the lands beyond the Wall, three men of the Night's Watch stumble across the massacred remains of wildlings. Ser Waymar Royce is confronted by several creatures of ice, the fabled 'Others' of legend. He fights one, but is killed. The second man, Will, investigates Waymar's corpse only for it to come back to life and strangle him. The third, Gared, is so terrified of what he sees that he flees back to the Wall, and then further south behind it. He is the deserter that Eddard Stark executes at the start of the book.

Jon Snow chooses to join the Night's Watch when his father departs for King's Landing and travels north with his uncle Benjen Stark, the First Ranger of the Watch. At the Wall, Jon finds the Watch is beset with problems. A new King-Beyond-The-Wall has arisen in the far northern lands to rally the wildlings to his banner. This man, Mance Rayder, was once a brother of the Night's Watch before defecting to the wildlings and joining them. Jon also learns that the Watch is greviously under strength, mustering barely a thousand men to cover the three hundred miles of Wall and nineteen castles that man it. To make things worse, its manpower is now made up of murderers and other criminals who chose the Wall over execution or other forms of punishment. Some time after Jon's arrival, Benjen vanishes whilst on a ranging beyond the Wall.

Jon and many of the other younger men are remorselessly bullied by the master-at-arms, Ser Alliser Thorne, but Jon concocts a plan for them to stand up to him. Jon wins the friendship of Samwell Tarly, a craven but intelligent boy from the Reach, and also that of Maester Aemon. Jon is startled to learn that Aemon is a member of House Targaryen, the grand-uncle of the now-deposed King Aerys II Targaryen, and the oldest man alive in Westeros.

The Lord Commander of the Night's Watch, Jeor Mormont, is attacked by a corpse which suddenly comes back to life. Jon burns the wight, saving Mormont's life. Shaken, Mormont resolves to lead the Watch beyond the Wall in strength to test Mance Rayder's capabilities. Although news of his father's execution and his brother's war causes Jon to doubt his calling, he decides that his place is with the Watch.

In EssosEdit

In the Free City of Pentos, Magister Illyrio Mopatis and the exiled Prince Viserys Targaryen conspire to marry Viserys' thirteen-year-old sister Daenerys to Khal Drogo of the Dothraki. Drogo commands a horde of forty thousand mounted warriors whom Viserys plans to use to reclaim his homeland from the usurper Robert I Baratheon. Among the wedding gifts are three petrified dragon eggs from Illyrio. Unexpectedly, Daenerys and Drogo find love in their marriage pact, eventually journeying east into the vast greenlands of the Dothraki Sea, and Daenerys becomes pregnant with his son, who is to be named Rhaego, after her dead brother, Rhaegar.  Ser Jorah Mormont, son of Jeor Mormont and a knight exiled from Westeros by Eddard Stark for dealing in slavery, joins Viserys' entourage as an advisor on the current state of the Seven Kingdoms.

Viserys becomes angry about how long he must wait before Drogo decides to invade Westeros and, in a drunken rage, insults Drogo greviously. Drogo decides to crown him on the spot - with molten gold. Daenerys picks up her brother's quest to reclaim the Iron Throne, but Drogo is just as obstinate with the moon of his life as he was with the Beggar King. The tables turn when a Westerosi assassin, in the pay of King Robert, nearly kills her and their unborn child; a furious Drogo agrees to invade Westeros. However, during a raid on the peaceful Lhazareen to fund their invasion, Drogo takes a wound fighting a rival khal. Daenerys loses both Drogo and her unborn child to the machinations of a Lhazareen witch, and has the witch burned in Drogo's funeral pyre. Daenerys had previously felt the eggs and found them warm in her touch, but not to the others'. Before she had placed them in a small fire and thought that the flames made something in the eggs alive. While the witch was being burned she placed the eggs in the blazing fire. Incredibly, the eggs hatch, and Daenerys Targaryen, the Stormborn, becomes mother to the first three dragons seen in the world for one hundred and sixty years. 

POV CharactersEdit

All of the novels in the series use a system for the chapters where they are not listed numerically or with any particular subtitle. Instead, each chapter is based on a particular character's limited third-person perspective, and as a result the name of that chapter will be their name (For eg. A chapter from the point of view of Tyrion will be called "Tyrion"). The story will flip back and forth between a particular set of these POV characters. This system is used for all chapters except the Prologue, which are named "Prologue".

The tale of A Game of Thrones is told through the eyes of eight POV characters and a one-off prologue.

AdaptationEdit

A Song of Ice and Fire and the majority of its content and story were later adapted to the TV screen in 2011 with the beginning of the Game of Thrones TV series. A Game of Thrones was adapted into the first season of the series, with much of its content being accurate to the book, but with exceptions. The following is a list of content that was adapted, cut or tweaked for television.

Content AdaptedEdit

  • Prologue: The opening prologue of the book, featuring the ranging of Waymar Royce, Will and Gared, is all adapted into the first episode of the first season.
  • Bran I: The scene where Eddard Stark executes Gared and the direwolf pups are recovered is adapted into the first episode of the first season.
  • Catelyn I: The scene where Catelyn informs Eddard Stark of Jon Arryn's death and of Robert I's approach to Winterfell is adapted into the first episode of the first season.
  • Daenerys I: The scene where Daenerys bathes and is presented to Drogo for the first time is adapted into the first episode of the first season.
  • Eddard I: The scene where Robert, his family and his retainers arrive at Winterfell, as well as the scene where he visits Lyanna Stark's statue in the crypts and names Eddard Hand of the King is adapted into the first episode of the first season.
  • Jon I: The scene where Jon Snow speaks with both Benjen Stark and Tyrion Lannister during the feast is adapted into the first episode of the first season.
  • Catelyn II: The scene in Eddard and Catelyn's bedchamber where she reveals Lysa's letter and they discuss Robert's offer is adapted into the first episode of the first season.
  • Arya I: The overall premise of the scene where Arya watches the boys spar in the yard is adapted into the first episode of the first season.
  • Bran II: The scene where Bran discovers Jaime and Cersei having sex before Jaime shoving him out the window is adapted in the first episode of the first season.
  • Daenerys II: The scene where Daenerys is offered gifts at her wedding to Drogo before going on a brief ride and making love to Drogo is adapted into the first episode of the first season.
  • Tyrion I: The scene where Tyrion slaps Joffrey and demands he pay his respects to the Starks is adapted into the second episode of the first season.
  • Jon II: The scene where Jon says goodbye to Bran, Robb and Arya is adapted into the second episode of the first season.
  • Eddard II: The scene where Eddard and Robert discuss the threat of Daenerys' marriage is adapted into the second episode of the first season.
  • Tyrion II: The scene where Tyrion tells Jon the realities of the Night's Watch and life on the Wall is adapted into the second episode of the first season.
  • Catelyn III: The scene where Catelyn breaks down over Bran's fall and where she stops an attempt on Bran's life is adapted into the second episode of the first season.
  • Sansa I: The scene where Joffrey takes Sansa on a ride, only to run into Arya and Mycah sword-fighting near the river, as well as the events that follow, are adapted into the second episode of the first season.
  • Eddard III: The scene where Sansa and Joffrey offer different accounts about the attack on Joffrey, as well as the death of Sansa's direwolf, Lady, as punishment, is all adapted into the second episode of the first season.
  • Bran III: The scene where Bran is dreaming of a three-eyed crow is adapted into the second episode of the first season, but the pace, tone and execution of the scene is entirely different.
  • Daenerys III: The scene where Daenerys decides to be less submissive in her marriage with Drogo and has sex with him from on top instead of being taken from behind is adapted into the second episode of the first season. Also adapted was the scene where Daenerys finally stands up to her brother Viserys, demonstrating the leadership ability she possesses over him. This scene was adapted into the third episode of the first season.
  • Catelyn IV: The scene where Catelyn and Ser Rodrik arrive in King's Landing and ask Petyr Baelish about the knife is adapted into the third episode of the first season, although with slight differences.
  • Jon III: The scene where, after training, Jon is ambushed by the recruits only to be saved by Donal Noye, is adapted into the third episode of the first season, but with a few differences.
  • Eddard IV: The scene where Eddard arrives in King's Landing and immediately attends a small council meeting to arrange a tournament is adapted into the third episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Baelish leads Eddard to the brothel and, as a result, his wife, where they plan their strategy for justice; this scene was adapted into the same episode.
  • Tyrion III: The scene where Tyrion dines with the high officers of the Night's Watch and promises Lord Commander Mormont to relay their need to the king is adapted into the third episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Jon asks Tyrion what he can do to help his brother Bran, which is adapted into the same episode.
  • Arya II: The scene where Arya vehemently leaves the dinner table only to be talked to by her father later, where he allows her to keep the sword Jon made for her is adapted into the third episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where she meets her dancing master, Syrio Forel, who was contracted by Eddard to teach Arya how to use a sword; this scene was adapted into the same episode.
  • Bran IV: The scene where Bran asks for a scary story and is told about the Long Night and the Others is adapted into the third episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Bran is presented to Tyrion and, despite Robb's lack of hospitality towards the dwarf, Tyrion offers to help Bran. This scene was adapted into the fourth episode of the first season.
  • Eddard V: The scene where Eddard enquires with Grand Maester Pycelle about Jon Arryn's death is adapted into the fourth episode of the first season. Another scene adapted is the one where Eddard learns of Jon Arryn's discovery, which is executed differently when adapted into the sixth episode of the first season. Yet another scene adapted is where Baelish tells Eddard that four of the late Lord Arryn's household guard are still in King's Landing, including Ser Hugh; this scene was adapted into the same episode. Yet another scene that was adapted where Eddard encounters Arya practicing for her water dancing; again, this was adapted into the same episode.
  • Jon IV: The scene where Samwell Tarly first arrives at Castle Black, only to be immediately victimized by Ser Alliser, is adapted into the fourth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Jon and the other recruits agree to go easy on Samwell; this is adapted into the same episode.
  • Eddard VI: The scene where Eddard attends a small council meeting to address security concerns at the tourney is adapted into the fourth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Eddard visits Tobho Mott to investigate Gendry, who he discovers is one of Robert's bastard sons; this scene is adapted into the same episode. 
  • Catelyn V: The scene where Catelyn enlists the aid of numerous knights loyal to House Tully to seize and imprison Tyrion at an Inn is adapted into the fourth episode of the first season.
  • Sansa II: The scene where Sansa attends the tourney and watches the joust between Gregor Clegane and Ser Hugh, which ends in the latter's death, and Littlefinger explains how the Hound got his burnt face, is adapted into the fourth episode of the first season, with slight differences in execution.
  • Daenerys IV: The scene where Drogo's khalasar arrives at Vaes Dothrak and Daenerys discusses the pros and cons of Dothraki combat skills with Ser Jorah is adapted into the fourth episode of the first season, with slight differences. Also adapted is the scene where Daenerys invites Viserys to supper, only for him to try and abuse her, which ends up in her striking him for the first time; this was adapted into the same episode.
  • Eddard VII: The scene where Eddard and Ser Barristan view Ser Hugh's body and discuss his death is adapted into the fifth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Eddard convinces Robert not to compete in the tourney, with slight differences; this is adapted into the same episode. Yet another scene adapted is the joust between Ser Loras Tyrell and Gregor Clegane, as well as the outburst by Clegane at his defeat, and the Hound saving Loras' life; this was also adapted into the same episode.
  • Tyrion IV: The scene where Tyrion is trying to convince Lady Catelyn of his innocence before being ambushed by mountain clansmen, where he ends up saving Catelyn, is adapted into the fifth episode of the first season, with slight differences.
  • Arya III: The scene where Arya is chasing a cat only to end up in the dungeons, where she overhears two men talking about killing her father, and eventually ends up escaping and informing said father is adapted into the fifth episode of the first season, with some differences.
  • Eddard VIII: The scene where Eddard and King Robert argue over the plot to assassinate Daenerys, before Eddard resigns in protest, is adapted into the fifth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Baelish informs Eddard of a brothel Jon Arryn visited, but with slight differences; this was adapted into the same episode.
  • Catelyn VI: The scene where Catelyn and her party of retainers reaches the Eyrie and Lady Lysa is met for the first time is adapted into the fifth episode of the first season, with slight differences.
  • Eddard IX: The scene where Eddard visits the brothel Baelish referred to and learns of more of Robert's bastards is adapted into the fifth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Eddard and his men are engaged by Jaime Lannister, who is convinced that Eddard authorized Tyrion's capture. During the battle, Jory Cassel is killed and Eddard is left injured; this scene was adapted into the same episode, but with some major differences in execution.
  • Bran V: The scene where Bran rides a horse for the first time in a while, only to be attacked by wildlings and then rescued by Robb and Theon, with one wildling, Osha, taken prisoner, is adapted into the sixth episode of the first season, with some obvious differences.
  • Tyrion V: The scene where Tyrion finally manages to bribe Mord into allowing him audience with Lady Lysa is adapted into the sixth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where he demands a trial by combat, and Bronn stands forward to be his champion; this is adapted into the same episode.
  • Eddard X: The scene where Eddard awakens in bed to Robert angry about Tyrion's abduction, before then reinstating him as Hand of the King and leaving on a hunt, is adapted into the sixth episode of the first season, with some huge differences. The scene featuring his flashback to the Tower of Joy showdown during Robert's Rebellion did not feature in Season 1, but made an appearance in the third episode of the sixth season (the first half), although heavily changed. The second half of the vision was shown in the tenth episode of the sixth season, also heavily changed.
  • Catelyn VII: The scene where the trial by combat, fought by Lysa's champion Ser Vardis Egen and Tyrion's champion Bronn, takes place and Tyrion is freed is adapted into the sixth episode of the first season, with some major differences.
  • Eddard XI: The scene where Eddard hears of Ser Gregor raiding Tully holdfasts before stripping Ser Gregor of all his titles and lands and order Lord Dondarrion to dispense the king's justice is adapted into the sixth episode of the first season, with some slight differences.
  • Sansa III: The scene where Eddard tells Sansa and Arya he is sending them back to Winterfell is adapted into the sixth episode of the first season, with some major differences.
  • Daenerys V: The scene where Daenerys eats a stallion's heart as part of a Dothraki pregnancy ritual is adapted into the sixth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Viserys insults Drogo before being restrained and Drogo pours molten gold onto his head, killing him; this is adapted into the same episode.
  • Eddard XII: The scene where Eddard, after learning the secret Lord Arryn died for, shows Cersei mercy and tells her to flee, before she stubbornly tells him he has made a mistake, is adapted into the seventh episode of the first season, with some slight differences.
  • Eddard XIII: The scene where Eddard is informed of Robert being gutted by a boar, before seeing him and being named Regent where shortly after, Robert dies, is adapted into the seventh episode of the first season, with some differences. Another scene adapted is the one where Renly confronts Eddard and pleads with him to have Cersei and her children placed into custody and for Renly to be named king, but Eddard refuses; it is adapted into the same episode. Yet another scene also adapted is the one where Eddard is writing a letter to Stannis Baratheon (who is the rightful heir after Robert), only for Baelish to see him, where he proposes getting the loyalty of the City Watch; this is also adapted into the same episode.
  • Jon VI: The scene where Jon learns he will be a steward, not a ranger, is adapted into the seventh episode of the first season, with slight differences. Also adapted is the scene where Jon and Samwell enter the godswood beyond the Wall to say their vows and become men of the Night's Watch, and Ghost recovers part of a human arm; this is adapted into the same episode.
  • Eddard XIV: The scene where Eddard confronts Joffrey and informs him he has no right to the throne and tries to have the City Watch take custody of him, only for them to turn on his men and for Baelish to reveal his betrayal and capture him, is adapted into the seventh episode of the first season, with some differences in execution.
  • Daenerys VI: The scene where Daenerys tries to convince Drogo to invade the Seven Kingdoms but fails is adapted into the seventh episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where she is almost poisoned by a wine merchant, but is called out by Ser Jorah and captured by the Dothraki before he can escape; this was adapted into the same episode.
  • Tyrion VI: The scene where Tyrion and Bronn make camp, are surrounded by clansmen calling themselves the Stone Crows and Tyrion manages to ally himself with the Stone Crows is adapted into the eighth episode of the first season, with some differences.
  • Arya IV: The scene where Ser Meryn Trant and some Lannister guardsmen try to capture Arya only to be forced to battle Syrio Forel as Arya escapes is adapted into the eighth episode of the first season. Another scene adapted is the one where Arya enters the stables, recovers her sword and accidentally kills a stable boy when he tries to capture her for a reward; this scene is adapted into the same episode.
  • Sansa IV: The scene where Sansa is summoned by Cersei and the Small Council to write to Winterfell of her father's "treachery" is adapted into the eighth episode of the first season, but with some slight differences.
  • Jon VII: The scene where the bodies of two men from Benjen's ranging party are discovered and their appearance noted odd is adapted in the eighth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Jon learns of his father's imprisonment, and Ser Alliser mocks him, which causes Jon to try and attack Ser Alliser, only to be spotted by Lord Commander Mormont; this is adapted into the same episode. Yet another scene adapted is one where one of the wights wakes up and attacks Lord Commander Mormont in his quarters, only for Jon to save him and burn the wight, before escaping with the Lord Commander; this scene is adapted into the same episode, with some differences.
  • Bran VI: The scene where Osha visits Bran in the godswood and tells him of the old gods and the Others is adapted into the eighth episode of the first season, with some major differences.
  • Catelyn VIII: Barely anything from this chapter was adapted; the only adapted content from this chapter is an event that is only mentioned by Catelyn, but expanded upon in the eighth episode of the first season; it is the scene where Catelyn, before leaving the Eyrie, tries to convince Lysa to send troops to aid Robb, but she refuses, causing Catelyn to leave. Also adapted is the scene where Catelyn arrives at Robb's camp, although this scene is so different from the book version so as to be not even synonymous.
  • Tyrion VII: The scene where Tyrion, Bronn and his clansmen arrive at Lord Tywin's camp, as well as the scene where the Stone Crows burst in on a meeting between Tyrion and Tywin and demand Tyrion fights with them is adapted into the eighth episode of the first season, with some differences.
  • Sansa V: The scene where Ser Barristan is dismissed from the Kingsguard before angrily storming out and Sansa pleads for her father's life by asking for mercy from King Joffrey is adapted into the eighth episode of the first season, with some differences.
  • Eddard XV: The scene where Varys visits Eddard in the black cells and tries to persuade him to admit to his treason by denouncing Stannis and Renly and having Robb lay down his sword is adapted into the eighth episode of the first season, but with some differences. Parts of this concept of a scene were created and adapted into the ninth episode of the first season, but with obvious huge differences. The scene featuring his flashback to the Tourney at Harrenhal where Rhaegar Targaryen rode past his own wife to lay roses in the lap of Lyanna Stark did not feature in Season 1, and was instead recounted by Petyr Baelish to Sansa in the fourth episode of the fifth season.
  • Daenerys VII: The scene where Drogo's khalasar raids a Lhazareen village and Daenerys intervenes when she sees Dothraki warriors raping captured women is adapted into the eighth episode of the first season. Another scene adopted is the one where Drogo is challenged by another Dothraki, and Drogo kills him, although he is injured, and a witch named Mirri Maz Duur offers to heal him; this scene is adapted into the same episode, but with some major differences.
  • Catelyn IX: The scene where Robb's army arrives at the Twins is adapted into the ninth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Catelyn meets with Lord Walder Frey to discuss their crossing; this scene is adapted into the same episode. Yet another scene adapted is the one where Catelyn returns and informs Robb of Walder Frey's compromise; he will allow them to cross if Robb marries one of his daughters; this scene is adapted into the same episode.
  • Jon VIII: The scene where Jon, rewarded for saving Lord Commander Mormont's life, is given Jorah's former sword, the valyrian steel blade named Longclaw, is adapted into the ninth episode of the first season. Another scene adapted is the one where Jon is summoned by Maester Aemon, and the maester reveals he is a Targaryen; this scene is adapted into the same episode.
  • Tyrion VIII: The scene where Tyrion arrives in a tent with Bronn and meets a whore named Shae for the first time is adapted into the ninth episode of the first season. Also adapted is the scene where Tyrion wakes up the next morning and gets in his armor, before entering the battle, although with major differences; this scene is adapted into the same episode. Yet another scene adapted is the one where Tyrion wakes up after the battle is over, where he learns from Tywin that Robb Stark has tricked them, and that the rest of his force bypassed them during the engagement and moved for Riverrun to engage Jaime's host; this is adapted into the same episode.
  • Catelyn X: The scene where Catelyn learns of Robb's victory in the Whispering Wood, as well as the capture of Jaime Lannister, is adapted into the ninth episode of the first season, with some differences.
  • Daenerys VIII: The scene where Drogo falls from his horse and Daenerys orders the khalasar to set up camp is adapted into the ninth episode of the first season. Another scene adapted is the one where Daenerys orders Mirri Maz Duur to perform blood magic to save Drogo, and Jorah kills all of Drogo's bloodriders as they try to intervene before taking Daenerys into the tent as she goes into labour; this scene is adapted into the same episode.
  • Arya V: The scene where Arya is surviving on the streets before the bells at the Sept of Baelor begin to ring are adapted into the ninth episode of the first season. Another scene that is adapted is the one where Arya witnesses Eddard's execution at the hands of Ser Ilyn Payne on the orders of Joffrey, as well as her rescue at the hands of Yoren; this is adapted into the same episode. Yet another adaptation is the scene where Yoren declares Arya is coming with him, and begins to cut her hair to make her look like a boy; this scene is adapted into the tenth episode of the first season.
  • Bran VII: The scene where Bran, through Maester Luwin, learns of Lord Eddard's death is adapted into the tenth episode of the first season, with major differences in execution.
  • Sansa VI: The scene where Joffrey torments Sansa by showing her Eddard's head on a spike, and where she has an opportunity to push Joffrey off a wall only to be stopped is adapted into the tenth episode of the first season.
  • Daenerys IX: The scene where Daenerys wakes to learn of her son's death, and finds out the cost of the bloodmagic when she discovers Drogo still alive, but trapped within his own body, is adapted into the tenth episode of the first season. Another scene adapted is the one where Daenerys tries to revive Drogo but gives into the reality of the situation and smothers him with a pillow; this is adapted into the same episode.
  • Tyrion IX: The scene where Tywin tells Tyrion he is sending him to King's Landing to rule as Hand in his stead is adapted into the tenth episode of the first season, with slight differences.
  • Jon IX: The scene where Jon decides to desert and join Robb only to be stopped by his fellow brothers and convinced to stay is adapted into the tenth episode of the first season. Another scene adapted is the one where Lord Commander Mormont reveals he knew of Jon's attempt to leave, and convinces him to stay as he prepares to lead a great ranging beyond the Wall, and Jon will come with them.
  • Catelyn XI: The scene where Robb's bannermen declare him the King in the North is adapted into the tenth episode of the first season, but with huge differences.
  • Daenerys X: The scene where Daenerys builds a funeral pyre for Drogo, attaches Mirri Maz Duur to it before burning it and walking into flames, and then emerging unburnt with three dragons is adapted into the tenth episode of the first season, and serves as the finale of the book, and the conclusion of that episode.

Cut Content and Differences Between Book and ShowEdit

  • In the book, the prologue states that the three rangers beyond the Wall have been ranging for days, and have therefore made a significant distance between them and the Wall. In the TV series, they have only just left the Wall and only get as far as the Haunted Forest (which can be viewed from the Wall).
  • In the book, the White Walker attack happens after the rangers have been ranging for days and are far away from the Wall. In the TV Series, it happens on the same day they leave the Wall, and not far from it either.
  • In the book, the White Walkers are largely referred to as the Others, and only the wildlings call them the "white walkers." In the TV series, the name "others" is never used, and they are always referred to as the White Walkers. This is due to the TV show Lost already having a faction called the Others, and a conflict of interests led to the name change.
  • In the book, when Will finds the dead wildlings, he says they look to have been sleeping and likely froze to death. In the TV series, Will clearly observes the mutilated remains of wildling bodies, who's corpses have been cut up and arranged in a sort of artistic fashion.
  • The White Walkers are of different appearance. In the books, they have white skin and reflective white armor. In the TV series, they have frozen grey skin, dark hair, and a brutal face similar to a skull. They don't seem to wear any armor, and do not do so until Season 5.
  • In the book, Gared is left a short distance away to protect the horses while Will and Waymar investigate the wildling camp. Will climbs a tree to get a visual on the seemingly missing wildlings, while Waymar stays on the ground to face the white walkers himself. In the TV series, Will is exploring the area and Gared and Waymar are checking the wildling camp site when the walkers attack. 
  • In the book, at least five walkers approach Ser Waymar Royce, who actually has a duel with one of them for a brief period of time before the walker then shatters his sword. He is injured when the sword shatters, mutilating his hand, leaving him vulnerable as the group of walkers then cut him down. In the TV Series, only two walkers appear, and Waymar is killed in a surprise attack by one, with the scream heard by Will a distance away signifying his death. 
  • The wight girl, who Will finds impaled on a tree, is described in the book, but differs from the TV series depiction. In the book, she is clearly described as a woman. In the series however, she is clearly a child. Also, in the books, she is seen briefly. In the TV series, she not only appears briefly, but also appears as a wight after Waymar is slain, frightening Will and causing him to flee in terror.
  • In the book, Ser Waymar is transformed into a wight and strangles Will. In the TV series, neither Gared or Will are present, so therefore it is likely Ser Waymar transformed into a wight offscreen.
  • In the book, how the rangers are attacked and how they die is different from the TV series. In the book, Gared is sent to protect the horses while Will and Waymar investigate the camp site. Will climbs a tree to find the wildlings, and as a result watches as five walkers engage and kill Waymar. Once they are gone, Will climbs down and investigates Waymar's corpse, only for it to become a wight, leap up and strangle Will to death; Gared manages to escape, and is the one that is beheaded by Lord Stark for desertion. In the TV series, Will goes out exploring, while Gared and Waymar investigate the camp site. Gared watches as a walker comes up behind and kills Waymar from behind, and both Will and Gared flee. Gared and Will run into each other, and Will is forced to watch as a second walker comes up behind Gared and decapitates him. Somehow, Will was either let go or managed to escape, and in the TV series canon, is the one who is beheaded by Lord Stark for desertion.
  • The riding race that Jon Snow and Robb Stark have in the first chapter of the book (after the prologue), which leads to them finding the dead direwolf, is absent from the TV series.
  • Targaryens are known not only for their white hair, but their violet-colored eyes. While the white hair was kept, the violet-colored eyes were removed in the TV series because the actors found the contact lenses too annoying and hard to work with on set.
  • Jeyne Poole, who is one of Sansa's best friends and goes with her to King's Landing in the book, and becomes a recurring minor character who appears every once and a while, only ever appears in the first episode of the first season, played by an unidentified extra. Her character can be seen during the feast talking to Sansa briefly. Afterwards, her character is never mentioned or ever seen again.
  • The entrance of the Royal Family and House Stark to the feast, as described in the book, is absent in the TV series, which simply jumps to the middle of the feast.
  • In the book, Jon Snow attends the feast, but sits with the commoners, where he is able to consume large amounts of alcohol, and even becomes slightly drunk. In the TV series, he is not present at the feast, and instead practices outside because Lady Catelyn doesn't want a "bastard in their midst."
  • The scene in the book where Arya sits down with Jon to watch Bran spar with Tommen while supervised by Ser Rodrik was entirely cut in the TV series, and was instead replaced by the scene of Jon giving Arya her sword, Needle.
    • There is, however, a scene that was present in the unaired pilot episode that did adapt this scene from the book. However, instead of Jon and Arya, it is Joffrey and the Hound who are watching. However, this pilot episode was simply a rough cut prototype for the eventual official first episode, and therefore does not count as official TV series continuity.
  • In the book, Eddard and Catelyn have just finished having sex when Luwin appears with Lysa's letter, and therefore is naked when she gets out of bed. She does not care, remarking that it does not matter as Maester Luwin delivered all her children. In the TV series, the couple are merely cuddling in bed, and Catelyn has a sleeping robe on.
  • Will's capture is not described in the book; his execution is seen from Bran's point of view, who is not present when Will was found and captured. In the TV series, Will is captured by a group of Stark cavalry, who corner him with their spears.
  • The introduction of the Starks in the book is different to that of the TV series. In the book, the Starks are introduced, one by one, in Bran's thoughts while witnessing the execution of Gared. In the TV series, an additional scene is added where Bran is practicing archery, while being guided by Jon Snow and Robb Stark; his father, Eddard Stark and mother, Catelyn Stark, watch from a balcony up above. This scene does not occur in the book.
  • The scene with the needle work in the book is moved to an earlier point in the TV series, and it occurs before the arrival of King Robert and the royal family. Because of this, Myrcella Baratheon is not present in the scene like she is in the book. Septa Mordane also does not humiliate Arya like she does in the book, and Arya's reason for leaving is different; in the book, it was out of embarassment and anger. In the TV series, it is because she can hear Bran practicing archery in the yard, and races out to watch.
  • In the TV series, Arya is shown to be an accurate archer, as she manages to get a perfect bullseye, unlike Bran, who is unable to even hit the target; she then smugly runs off as Bran chases her in frustration. In the book, because this scene is not present, Arya's archery skills are never shown. A matter of fact, in the books, she has never fired a bow, and wishes that she could learn; she never fires a single arrow in any of the books.
  • In the TV series, after Will's beheading, everybody watches on solemnly, and not a word is spoken for a moment afterwards. In the book, after Gared's beheading, Theon kicks the head away, laughing, which disgusts Jon Snow, who reveals he never liked Theon anyway. In the TV series, Jon Snow's opinion on Theon is never actually revealed or explained, as he never has a seen alone with him; also Theon makes no movement when the head rolls away.
  • Events of the TV series are seventeen years after Robert's Rebellion. This is opposed to the books, which take place fourteen years after, therefore making the Stark children visibly older in the series in comparison to the books. In the book, Robb and Jon Snow are 14 (turning 15), Bran is 7 and Rickon is 3. In the TV series, Robb and Jon Snow are 17, Bran is 10 and Rickon is 6. The Stark girls age is changed as well. Sansa is 11 in the books, 13 in the series, and Arya is 9 in the books but 11 in the series.
  • Likewise, the royal children are older: In the books, Joffrey is 12, Myrcella is 8 and Tommen is 7, while in the series Joffrey is 16, Myrcella is 11 and Tommen is 10.
  • In the book, Daenerys is 13 (turning 14), while in the series she is 16.
  • In the book, snow begins to cover the area around Winterfell. In the TV series, there is no snow. Also, in the book, the direwolf pups were found waist-deep in snow. 
  • In the TV series, there is a scene in King's Landing where Cersei and Jaime are introduced, and shows Jon Arryn's funeral in the throne room. In the book, this never happens as neither of the two characters have POV chapters at that point. In the book, their conversation about Jon Arryn's death and their secrets instead happens while they are having sex in the Broken Tower, where Bran discovers them.
  • Daenerys Targaryen appears much later in the TV series than she does in the book. In the book, her first chapter occurs after Catelyn's first chapter; right after Eddard learns of Jon Arryn's death. In the TV series, she appears after King Robert and Eddard discuss the absence of the Targaryens in the crypts beneath Winterfell.
  • Illyrio Mopatis' appearance is different to his description in the books in comparison to the TV series. In the book, he is described as being morbidly obese with gold, oiled hair and a forked yellow beard. In the TV series, he is overweight and has dark brown hair flecked with grey with a forked beard. 
  • Khal Drogo's appearance is slightly different to his description in the books. He is described as having long mustachios with rings in them and many bells in his long braid. In the TV series, he has a beard with a single ring in it and does not have bells in his hair.
  • In the book, Daenerys, Viserys and Illyrio go to Khal Drogo's manse in Pentos and attend a party there to celebrate Drogo and Daenerys' engagement. Many people appear in this party, including guests from other Free Cities and several other khals; also, this party is where Ser Jorah is first seen. In the TV series, this party is entirely cut, and Daenerys is presented to Drogo for the first time while he is still mounted on his horse. Upon seeing her, he and his warriors then ride off, and Ser Jorah is instead first introduced during the wedding itself when he presents his wedding gift to Daenerys. 
  • Tyrion Lannister's appearance is different to his description in the books. He is described as having stunted legs, a swollen forehead, a squashed in-face and eyes of different colors. He also walks with a profound waddle. The TV series version of Tyrion possesses none of these traits.
  • In the book, the arrival of King Robert and the royal family at Winterfell is described from Eddard's point of view; because of this, the following scenes from the TV series do not occur in the book: Catelyn and Luwin preparing for the feast; Robb, Theon and Jon getting ready for the arrival of the royal family by shaving; Bran sighting the royal family ontop of a wall; Catelyn scolding Bran for climbing the wall; Arya watching the arrival of the royal family; House Stark and their retainers lining up to greet the royal family and Arya's whimsy.
  • In the book, Queen Cersei and the royal children arrive in a very large wheelhouse, described as being huge. As the book goes, it was pulled by "forty heavy draft horses" and "too wide to pass through the castle gate"; thus the queen has to disembark outside and walk into the castle. In the TV series, the wheelhouse is much smaller, enough so as to fit through the gate with no problem, and pulled by far lesser horses.
  • Tyrion's introduction from the book is different than the TV series introduction. In the book, Tyrion was introduced when he came across Jon Snow (a scene which is also present in the TV series). In the TV series however, he is introduced before this, summoned by Jaime who finds him with a whore named Ros
  • The prostitute Ros is a TV series invention; there is no such character in the book. However, one such prostitute in the book was described as being a "red haired whore", just like Ros. This character was briefly mentioned, whereas Ros becomes a recurring character right up to Season 3.
  • In the book, Robert visits Lyanna's tomb (guided by Eddard) first, and then requests Eddard to be his Hand of the King. In the TV series, this is done in reverse order.
  • There's an additional conversation added in the TV series between Catelyn and Sansa that establishes Sansa's personality, and her romance subplot with Joffrey. In the book, she is briefly described at the feast and her personality and subplot are established at the Trident.
  • In the book, Benjen Stark enters the feast along with the royal family and House Stark. In the TV series, he arrives late, after the feast has started.
  • In the book, the description of the feast is done from Jon's point of view, thus it focuses on his conversation with Benjen and his conversation with Tyrion. Because of this, the scenes of the other activities occurring during the feast are inventions of the TV series, including: King Robert's activities and Cersei's reactions, conversation between Benjen and Eddard, conversation  between Catelyn and Cersei; conversation between Jaime and Eddard about tournaments; Sansa speaking to the queen and Arya throwing food at Sansa before being escorted out by a laughing Robb.
  • In the book, Lysa's letter to Catelyn is coded, found in a box with a false bottom and was left in Maester Luwin's room by an unknown party. In the TV series, the letter isn't coded and came via a messenger. Production images for the TV show however show that the letter actually is coded, using a symbolic code invented for the TV series. This subplot however was dropped during production however, as it was deemed too complicated for TV-first viewers. In the final version, the camera never actually sees what is written on the letter, only Catelyn's reaction.
  • Daenerys' and Khal Drogo's wedding occurs earlier in the TV series than it did in the book.
  • Jorah Mormont's appearance is different to his description in the books. In the books, he is described as bald, stocky, hairy and unattractive, but is strong and fit. In the TV series, he has short blond hair and is leaner and more attractive by comparison.
  • There is some controversy surrounding the TV series version of the Daenerys' sex scene with Drogo that occurs after the wedding. In the book, Daenerys was initially hesitant and reluctant to have sex with Drogo, and Drogo was seemingly patient, letting her undress him. After a while, she finally began to give in, until she eventually made the first move by moving into his lap and beginning their lovemaking. In the TV series however, Drogo is portrayed as careless and indifferent, and simply bends her over and takes her from behind; unlike in the book, the scene is over quickly, and Daenerys takes no pleasure from it.
  • Catelyn's reaction to Robert's request for Eddard to be Hand of the King is vastly different in book and the TV series. In the book, she openly encourages him to accept the request, while in the series she is afraid for him and begs him not to accept. Also, in the book, Eddard planned to refuse Robert's request until Lysa's letter came up. In the TV series, this is reversed; he is ready to accept Robert's request until Lysa's letter came up, which makes him reluctant (the end result is the same in both media however: he ultimately accepts).
  • Cersei and Jaime are both naked in the book when Bran finds them having sex in the Broken Tower. In the TV series, they are both dressed; this is because the actress playing Cersei was pregnant during the filming of this scene.
  • In the book, Cersei is up against a wall while a man (Jaime) stands behind her and has his hand inbetween her legs. In the TV series, Cersei is on her hands and knees, while Jaime mounts her from behind.
  • In the book, Jaime pushes Bran from the window with his right hand. In the TV series, he uses his left.
  • In the TV series, Jon decides to join the Night's Watch completely on his own and no one wants to stop him. Lady Catelyn, unlike in the book, does not make a request for Jon to leave.
  • In the book, Tyrion does not fall asleep into the dog pen. He spends the entire night in the library without sleep, and in the morning he comes outside and encounters Joffrey and the Hound.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Viserys and Jorah talk, where Ser Jorah first reveals how he ended up exiled. Viserys remarks that under his rule he will not be punishment for such trivialities, further establishing Viserys' arrogance and overconfidence. This scene was invented entirely for the TV series, and does not occur anywhere in the book.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Jon watches Mikken make Arya's new sword, Needle. He is confronted by Jaime, who subtlely mocks his decision to join the Night's Watch before leaving. This scene was entirely invented for the TV series, and does not occur anywhere in the book; Arya's sword was made, but no such encounter  between Jon and Jaime is mentioned.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Cersei visits Bran bedroom to pay her respects, and a conversation between herself and Catelyn occurs. Cersei mentions having her first son with Robert, who had black hair, but died of an illness when he was very young; she then leaves. This scene was invented entirely for the TV series, and does not occur anywhere in the book. A matter of fact, Cersei never had a child with Robert in the books; the only time she got pregnant by Robert, she got an abortion without him knowing; she admits to Eddard later in the same book. This means the child she mentioned in the scene is also a TV series creation, or Cersei simply made the story up.
  • In the book, Catelyn is even more hostile to Jon when he appears to say goodbye to Bran, even threatening to call the guards if he doesn't leave.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where, on the kingsroad, Eddard and Jon say goodbye to each other, with Eddard promising to talk to Jon about his mother the next time they meet. This scene was invented entirely for the TV series, and does not occur anywhere in the book.
  • Daenerys' scene with Irri, Doreah and Jhiqui is shown much earlier in the TV series. So is the scene of making Khal Drogo happy. In the TV series, the scene where Doreah teaches Daenerys the "art of love" is shown, whereas in the book it was only implied.
  • In the books, Doreah has blonde hair. In the TV series, she has brown hair.
  • In the book, King Robert and Lord Eddard's conversation about Daenerys takes place during riding, while in the TV series it takes place during breakfast. In the book version of the scene, Jorah is revealed to be an informant for the small council, while in the TV series this doesn't occur until the fifth episode.
  • In the TV series, Yoren isn't present in the scene with the two rapists. The book also doesn't specify that Rast is one of the captured rapists.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Catelyn investigates the Broken Tower and finds a single lock of golden hair, where she suspects Lannister involvement even before the Valyrian dagger is found. This is invented entirely for the TV series, and does not occur in the book. In the book, Catelyn doesn't begin to suspect the Lannisters until she recovers the valyrian dagger used by the assassin.
  • In the TV series, Catelyn summons a meeting with Theon, Robb, Ser Rodrik and Maester Luwin in the godswood after the assassination attempt on Bran. In the book, this meeting takes place in Winterfell itself.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene showing Jon arriving at the Wall, with a large establishing shot. This scene was invented entirely for the TV series, as Jon's arrival is never depicted in the book.
  • In the book, there is a scene where Sansa and Arya talk about riding in a wheelhouse. In the TV series, this scene was cut, and Sansa first appears when she encounters Ilyn Payne, and her first confrontation with Arya is when she finds her sword-fighting with Mycah.
  • In the book, Ser Barristan and Renly are present at the Trident with the rest of Robert's entourage. In the TV series, Ser Barristan and Renly are in King's Landing, and do not appear on the Trident. Therefore, noone aside from the Hound is there when Sansa is frightened by Ser Ilyn.
  • In the book, Sansa and Joffrey go riding, and it takes a while before they run into Arya. In the TV series, they do not go for a ride, and they come across Arya fairly quickly.
  • In the book, Nymeria's escape is only mentioned, never seen; Arya implies so once found, stating that Jory found her and, together, threw stones at Nymeria until she ran away. In the TV series, this scene is shown, except Jory does not find Arya or help throw the stones, and Arya only throws one before Nymeria decides to run off.
  • Arya is missing for four days. When she is finally found in the TV series, she is not taken to Castle Darry like she is in the book, but to the Crossroads Inn. In the book, it is Jory who finds her, not Lannister soldiers, like in the TV series.
  • In the book, when Sansa lies about not remembering what happened, Arya knocks her to the ground and begins to beat her in fury. In the TV series, Arya merely knocks her before being separated.
  • In the book, Renly is present when Joffrey and Arya are called before King Robert. He bursts out laughing when he hears about Joffrey being disarmed by a little girl, and is asked to leave by Robert. None of this happens in the TV series, as he is not present. Instead, when the topic is brought up, Robert condescendingly asks "you let a little girl disarm you?" in place of Renly's outburst.
  • When Eddard talks to Arya in the book, he does not defend Sansa's lies. Instead he says that Jory's lie (about not finding Nymeria) was not without honor.
  • In the book, Eddard uses his greatsword Ice to execute Lady. In the TV series, he simply slits her throat with a dagger. 
  • Bran doesn't have dreams about the Three-Eyed Crow before he wakes up for the first time (In the book, the dreams wake him up). In the TV series, he wakes up when Lady, Sansa's direwolf, is executed. The book does not indicate any connection between Lady's death and Bran's awakening, although the TV series likely added the scene as a foreshadowing to the inherent warg ability in Bran.
    • In the TV series, all bird "crows" are removed entirely and replaced with ravens. As a result, the Three-Eyed Crow of the book became the Three-Eyed Raven for the TV series.
  • In the book, King Robert is initially acquiesced to Cersei's demands to have Lady executed in absentia of Nymeria, however, when Eddard beseeches him to reconsider, invoking the name of his sister Lyanna, Robert turns back to Cersei and curses her, but does nothing to stop the execution regardless. Later, he apologizes to Eddard for having him kill the direwolf, as he knew Joffrey was lying about the incident. In the TV series, Eddard does not drop Lyanna's name and Robert shows no remorse for having him kill the direwolf nor does he apologize for the incident later.
  • In the book, Eddard orders Lady's body be taken back to Winterfell to stop Cersei or any of her retinue from using the body to make a fur coat. In the TV series, no further mention is ever made of Lady after the direwolf's death, and therefore what happened to the body is unclear.
  • In the book, Sandor throws Mycah's body down before Eddard and after Eddard identifies the body, he states that Sandor rode him down. The Hound replies, laughing, that the boy didn't run very fast. In the TV series, Sandor leaves Mycah's body strung across the back of his horse, and walks his horse right past Eddard. Eddard states that Sandor rode him down, and in passing Sandor simply states that the boy ran, but not very fast. He does not laugh as he says, showing almost complete disinterest.
  • In the book, Catelyn and Ser Rodrik arrive in King's Landing before Eddard and do so via the sea in a ship from White Harbor. In the TV series, they arrive at King's Landing via horses, and arrive after Eddard.
  • In the book, Baelish summons Catelyn to the Red Keep. In the TV series, he summons her to a brothel he owns. The TV series explains this by having Baelish state that to summon her to the Red Keep would leave her in the open and easily noticed. Thus Catelyn's negative reaction, and the term "back alley sally", do not appear in the books.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Jaime confronts Eddard in the throne room, where Jaime describes and tries to justify what he did to the Mad King, only for Eddard to mock him on his way to the small council. This scene was an invention of the TV series, and never occurred in the book.
  • As described in the book, Jaime states that he slit the Mad King's throat, but in the TV series, he says he stabbed the Mad King in the back. Later, in the fifth episode of the third season, Jaime explains that he stabbed Aerys II in the back, before then slitting his throat to make sure he was dead.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Cersei imposes the importance of what it will mean to be king to Joffrey. This scene was invented entirely for the TV series, and does not occur in the book.
  • In the book, when the Royal Steward summons Eddard to a small council meeting, Eddard requests the appropriate garments. In the TV series, the royal steward asks if he would like to change, and Eddard ignores him.
  • In the book, Lord Commander Barristan Selmy was present at the small council meeting, but is absent in the TV series. This is because the writers didn't want Barristan to know Ser Jorah was an informant for the crown. In the fifth episode of the third season, there was an invented scene where Barristan specifically explains that he should have attended those meetings, but didn't due to his dislike of politics.
  • In the book, the badge of the Hand of the King was a clasp at his throat that held his cloak together. In the TV series, it is a broach on his chest.
  • The saying about the Hand is changed as well. In the book, the saying is "The King eats, the Hand takes the shit." In the TV series, it is "The King eats, and the Hand wipes."
  • Many recruits of the Night's Watch present in the book are cut from the TV series such as Toad and Halder, and Dareon's character makes a brief appearance. Parts of Dareon's dialogue is instead given to Pypar. In the first scene at the Wall, there are three notable recruits: Pypar, Grenn and Rast. Rast also gets more screentime in the show than he does in the books. There is also an unnamed recruit in the TV series that often accompanies Rast. It is possible that this could be Satin from the books, but the unnamed character in the series is never identified. 
  • In the book, Rast had the nickname of Rat, and Green the nickname of Aurochs. These nicknames are absent in the TV series. 
  • In the book, during the fight with Grenn, Jon fights Grenn and only Grenn. He also breaks Grenn's wrist during the fight. In the TV series, Jon fights multiple recruits as well as Grenn, and instead breaks his nose instead of his wrist.
  • In the book, it is Donal Noye who breaks up the fight between Jon, Grenn, Pypar, Toad and two others before advising him on fixing his attitude. In the TV series, it is Tyrion Lannister who breaks up the fight and offers the same advice. In fact, the Donal Noye character was entirely cut from the TV series.
  • The breakfast scene in King's Landing is extended in the TV series. Additional moments such as Arya stabbing the table, Eddard getting Sansa a doll and Mordane not following Arya into her room are added. 
  • In the TV Series, Old Nan's story about the White Walkers is told days before Tyrion Lannister returns from the Wall. Bran is also a lot more pessimistic in the series - he often repeats the phrase "I'd rather be dead."
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where King Robert, Ser Barristan and Ser Jaime discuss their first kills. This scene is an invention of the TV series, and does not occur in the book. This scene in the TV series also serves as the introduction of Lancel Lannister.
  • In the TV series, it is a recurring theme that Aerys II famous order was "Burn them all!" In the books however, it is never stated whether or not he actually said this.
  • In the TV series, Jaime claims that he killed many outlaws of the Kingswood Brotherhood back when he was a squire for Ser Barristan. In the book, he didn't kill anyone; he saved his master Lord Crakehall and crossed swords with the Smiling Knight (who was killed by Ser Arthur Dayne). Jaime was fifteen years old then.
  • In the book, Lord Commander Mormont had a raven that sat on his shoulder. This raven was cut from the TV series.
  • In the book, Yoren is introduced during the scene with Tyrion and Jon before reaching the Wall. In the TV series, he is introduced while talking to Tyrion in the mess hall of Castle Black. 
  • During the scene where Tyrion dines with the high officers of Castle Black, a lot of Mormont's dialogue is given to Maester Aemon. In the book, Aemon was present, but remained mostly in the background. Also, in the book, Ser Alliser was present for that scene, but is absent in the TV series.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Benjen says goodbye to Jon before leaving on his ranging. In the book, this moment is only mentioned.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Ser Jorah and Rakharo discuss weapons, and Irri bursts in to announce Daenerys' pregnancy. Ser Jorah then hurriedly leaves for Qohor, promising to join them again. This scene is entirely an invention of the TV series, and never occurs in the book.
  • Rakharo in the TV series seems to adopt personality traits of the book character Jhogo.
  • Syrio Forel's appearance is different from his description in the book. He has curly black hair instead of being bald.
  • In the TV series, a scene where Bran is dreaming. He dreams that he is standing in the courtyard shooting arrows when he is distracted by a raven that leads him into the crypt. Just as he reaches the entrance, the raven turns, revealing it to have three eyes, causing Bran to wake up. This scene was entirely invented for the TV series, and does not occur in the book. Bran does have a dream, but it is entirely different from how it is done in the TV series. In the book, Bran dreams he is falling, and the raven promises that he will fly (a line that is later spoken when Bran meets the three-eyed raven in the tenth episode of the fourth season).
  • In the TV series, when Tyrion arrives at Winterfell, it is Theon who comes to inform Bran, not Maester Luwin.
  • In the TV series, a scene where Theon mocks Tyrion as he is leaving before Tyrion turns it around and begins to make light of how he ended up in Winterfell is added. This is an invention of the TV series, and does not occur in the book. This scene was likely added to detail Theon's past and further develop his character.
  • In the TV series, Castle Black is shown to have walls and a gate in the series. In the books, it has none, so the Night's Watch can only defend against enemies coming from the North, and thus cannot rebel against the Seven Kingdoms.
  • Samwell Tarly's introduction is done slightly different in the TV series than in the book; this is largely because of the many omitted recruits. In the book, Samwell is attacked by Halder first. When Jon defends him, Alliser Thorne orders Halder, Rast and Albett to fight him. Grenn and Pyp intervene and take sides with Jon. In the TV series, Rast by himself is the one who attacks Samwell. Alliser Thorne then has Grenn, Pyp and Rast attack Jon, the latter of which defeats all of them.
  • In the book, Alliser and Rast mockingly call Samwell "Ser Piggy." In the TV series, this is mostly the same, except the nickname is "Lady Piggy." (In the book, Alliser only calls him "Ser Piggy" when Jon defends Sam).
  • In the TV series, Samwell tells Jon about his father ordering him to join the Night's Watch. In the book, Samwell Tarly remembers the scene with his father skinning a deer. This scenario was instead used for the introduction of Tywin Lannister; while he is talking to Jaime, he methodically skins a deer.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene with Doreah and Viserys in a bath. Viserys tells her about dragons and the Red Keep. After a while, Viserys gets tired of her questioning and they have sex. In the book, their sex is only implied, and the scene itself and the rest of its contents are inventions of the TV series.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Septa Mordane talks to Sansa about her future, Joffrey and the executions of Rickard and Brandon. This scene is entirely an invention of the TV series, and never occurred in the book.
  • In the TV series, a scene solely introducing Ser Hugh is added. Jory tries to convince the knight to speak with him about his former lord, Jon Arryn, but Ser Hugh arrogantly fogs him off. This scene is entirely an invention of the TV series, and Ser Hugh is only briefly mentioned in the book before being killed.
  • Tobho Mott tells Eddard that a mysterious man who did not identify himself paid him Gendry's apprentice fee. This does not described as happening in the book.
  • In the book, Tobho and Gendry tell Eddard that Stannis Baratheon accompanied Jon Arryn in his investigations. In the TV series, only Jon Arryn conducted his investigations.
  • In the book, Gendry is 16. In the TV series, he is 20.
  • In the TV series, a scene is added between Jaime and Jory. While Jaime is forced to guard Robert's chambers as he pleasures numerous whores, Jaime and Jory recount to each other the Siege of Pyke, and the things they saw during that battle. Eventually, Jory tries to leave the message from Eddard with Jaime, but Jaime bluntly refuses, and Jory leaves. This scene is an invention of the TV series, and does not occur in the book.
  • In the TV series, a scene is added to show the result of Jon's plan: the recruits do not dare to attack Samwell, and Alliser catches onto this, and is angered. This scene is an invention of the TV series, and does not occur in the book.
  • In the TV series, a scene is added where Jon and Samwell are scrubbing tables in the mess hall, and Jon reveals his experience with a prostitute (who is Ros). Ser Alliser then comes and tries to frighten them with stories about ranging beyond the Wall. In the book, this scene does not occur, and Ser Alliser is not a ranger, and therefore never went ranging beyond the Wall.
  • In the TV series, a scene is added where Cersei visits Eddard's office and asks as what his purpose in King's Landing is. This scene is an invention of the TV series, and does not occur in the book.
  • The Tournament of the Hand is a lot shorter in the TV series. The only noticable participants are Ser Gregor, Ser Hugh, Ser Loras and, partly, the Hound. The only shown fights are between Ser Gregor and Ser Hugh, Ser Gregor and Ser Loras and the duel between the Hound and Ser Gregor. There is no mention made of the archery contest or the melee. In the book, the jousting alone lasts just over two days.
  • In the TV series, it is Baelish who tells Sansa about the past surrounding the Hound's facial burns and the story of the Clegane brothers. In the book, the story is told by the Hound himself. Baelish warns that if the Hound found out Sansa knew that, he'd kill her. In the book, because the Hound tells her, he says that if she tells anyone, he'll kill her.
  • In the TV series, Arya attends the tournament. In the book, Jeyne Poole accompanies Sansa to the tournament, not Arya.
  • When Tyrion comes to Winterfell, the direwolves attack him for no apparent reason (he doesn't have any malicious intent, on the contrary). In the TV series, this doesn't occur.
  • In the TV series, the Hound does not get involved in the tourney, and he spends all his time near Prince Joffrey and King Robert. He only gets involved when Ser Gregor is about to kill Ser Loras.
  • In the book, House Clegane's sigil is three black dogs. In the TV series, it is only one, as is demonstrated by the sigil displayed on Ser Gregor's shield, which is different in the book and TV series.
  • In the book, Catelyn tells Tyrion that Littlefinger told her the dagger belonged to him, and he lost it to Tyrion in a wager when Jaime Lannister was defeated in a joust by Ser Loras. Tyrion explains to Catelyn why Littlefinger is lying: he [Tyrion] never bets against his family. In the TV series, Catelyn does not tell Tyrion who set him up.
  • In the book, as well as Bronn, there is another sellsword accompanying the entourage; Chiggen
  • Catelyn's party suffers from more than one ambush by the hill clansmen on the way to the Vale, most of their party is killed. Chiggen is heavily wounded, and Bronn slices his throat to prevent him from making noises and attract more ambushes. The only survivors are Catelyn, Tyrion, Ser Rodrik, Bronn and Marillion. In the TV series, only a few of their party were killed by the clansmen.
    • During the attack, Tyrion fights only with a shield. In the book, he uses an axe.
  • Besides the hill tribe ambushes, Catelyn's party also suffers from starving on the long road, and they have to kill horses to feed themselves.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene between Luwin and Bran where Luwin speaks of giants and wizards, but ultimately declares that they don't exist. This scene is an invention of the TV series, and does not occur in the book.
  • In the TV series, there is a sex scene between Theon and Ros. This scene is an invention of the TV series, and does not occur in the book.
  • In the book, Arya runs into Myrcella and Tommen while chasing cats, and runs away once confronted; she then ends up in the dungeons, where she overhears Varys and Illyrio's conversation. In the TV series, Arya does not run into Myrcella and Tommen, and instead chases the cat into the dungeons.
  • In the TV series, Arya only finds one dragon skull in the dungeons instead of finding several (like in the book). Due to the size of the skull found in the TV series, it was likely the skull of Balerion.
  • In the TV series, the dragon's skull is white. In the book, dragonbone is said to be black due to its high iron content.
  • There is an additional conversation in the Red Keep between Littlefinger and Varys. The spying on each other and Eddard Stark is revealed in this scene. The sexual habits of Lord Paxter are not discussed in the book.
  • In the book, Arya emerges from the dungeons miles away from the Red Keep and is also covered in sewage and must bathe in a river before she can return to the Keep. In the TV series, she leaves the dungeons via the tunnel beneath Aegon's Hill on which the Red Keep is located. 
  • The meeting between Yoren and Eddard is extended in the TV series. After Eddard sends Arya out with Jory (Desmond in the book). An additional scene is added after this where Yoren tells Eddard that Catelyn has captured Tyrion. In the book, a scene is described where Eddard takes Yoren to court and asks if any noble will do honor to his House and volunteer to serve at the Wall; none volunteer.
    • Due to the switching of roles, Jory is the one who answers Arya's question of whether or not her father will be safe in the TV series, not Desmond, who has been cut from the show.
  • The Eyrie's appearance is different from its description in the books. In the books, it's a small traditional castle made of seven towers located on a shoulder of a very tall mountain - the Giant's Lance. The path is also guarded by three smaller towers. In the TV series, the castle is located on top of a much smaller mountain and its path doesn't seem to be guarded by any smaller towers.
  • The Bloody Gate, the guarded pass to the Eyrie and the main entrance to the Vale in the books, doesn't appear in Season 1 (although it does appear in Season 4), neither do the characters Brynden Tully (who doesn't appear until Season 3) and Donnel Waynwood (who doesn't appear until Season 4), both of whom are guardians of the Bloody Gate at this time point (In the TV series, Brynden has nothing to do with the Bloody Gate; he is first met at Riverrun). Their roles were morphed into the character of Ser Vardis Egen in the TV series, who had a more minor role in the book. However, it is possible that in the TV series, by the time they run into Ser Vardis, they have already passed the Bloody Gate.
  • Catelyn's journey to the top of the Eyrie isn't depicted in the TV series like it was in the book. In the book, she makes the climb on the back of a mule. Mya Stone, the bastard daughter of King Robert, whose job it is to escort people to the Eyrie, was cut from the TV series. 
  • In the book, Catelyn reaches the Eyrie alone and then speaks to Lysa in her chambers. Tyrion is then brought after her, being winched up the next day in a basket. In the TV series, Catelyn and Tyrion reach the Eyrie together and both confront Lysa in the main hall in front of all important residents. In the TV series, an additional scene was shown after this that shows Tyrion in his imprisonment and briefly shows Mord, something which doesn't exist in the book.
  • In the book, Lysa's son is named Robert Arryn . In the TV series, he was renamed Robin Arryn to avoid confusion with King Robert.
  • Lysa's description in the books differs from her series counterpart. In the book, she is overweight and pale with a puffy face. In the TV series, she is very skinny.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene added between Ser Loras and Lord Renly, where Loras persuades Renly that he would be a good king. This scene is an invention of the TV series, and does not occur in the book. This scene confirms that Loras and Renly are lovers, which was only hinted at in the books.
  • In the TV series, a scene is added between King Robert and Queen Cersei, where they discuss the futility of their marriage, and Robert reveals how much he misses Lyanna. This scene is an invention of the TV series, and never occurs in the book.
  • In the TV series, Littlefinger takes Lord Eddard to the last place Jon Arryn was seen alive. In the book, Littlefinger takes Lord Eddard to a brothel he visited with Stannis Baratheon. 
  • The scene in which Ser Jaime attacks Lord Eddard is significantly different from the book. In the book, Eddard and his guards are on horseback, and are headed through the streets, having already left the brothel, when they are ambushed by the Lannisters. Jaime wants only to frighten Eddard and kills his Stark guards. Eddard does not duel with Jaime, and he falls from his horse, with the fallen horse landing on his leg and shattering it. In the TV series, Jaime attacks Eddard and his men outside the brothel whilst on foot, and Eddard engages Jaime in a duel. Instead of a horse landing on his leg and shattering it, a Lannister spearman stabs him through the back of the leg, leading to his injury. Also, in the TV series, Jory is clearly killed by Jaime; in the book, Jory's killer is never identified. In the TV series, the scene takes place in the day while it is sunny, while in the book it takes place at night while it is raining.
  • In the book, Wyl is torn from his horse and killed by Lannister soldiers. In the TV series, Wyl is speared. 
  • In the book, while wounded and unconscious, Eddard has a dream/flashback to the Tower of Joy showdown. This scene was omitted in Season 1, but was later added in Season 6, and the flashback instead given to Bran while he is in a vision.
  • In the TV series, a scene is added where Daenerys holds a heated dragon egg. Irri races in to stop Daenerys form burning herself, but burns her hands instead, revealing Daenerys' resistance to heat; this scene adds as a foreshadowing to Viserys' death as well as the hatching of the eggs. This scene is purely an invention of the TV series, and never occurred in the book.
  • In the book, when Robert and Cersei visit the injured Eddard, Eddard mentions he went to see Robert's bastard Barra. Robert is embarassed to hear this, while Cersei shows no emotion. In the TV series, Eddard doesn't mention his visit to the brothel at all.
  • In the TV series, Bran has yet another vision of the Three-Eyed Raven, which is the same as the last one. This does not happen in the book.
  • When Bran falls into an ambush while on his ride, there are only four attackers in the TV series: Stiv, Wallen, Osha and an unnamed man. In the book, there are six attackers: the previous four, another unnamed man and a short fat woman named Hali. Also, in the book, both Summer and Grey Wind get involved in the fight, but this doesn't happen in the TV series. 
  • In the TV series, a scene shows one of Tyrion's failed attempts to get Mord's attention by offering gold. In the book, he convinces Mord on his first attempt and men come to Tyrion's cell to confirm his willingness to confess his crime, allowing him to get them to make Mord return his shadowcat skin coat. 
  • In the TV series, there is another scene showing Arya and Syrio practicing, where Syrio says his famous quote "There's only one thing we say to death...not today." This is an invention of the TV series, and the quote and the scene do not occur in the book.
  • In the book, Eddard tells an angered Arya (who is angry that being sent back to Winterfell will force her to stop her lessons with Syrio) that Syrio can go back with her to Winterfell if he agrees to enter his service. This is mentioned nowhere in the TV series.
  • In the book, Arya and Sansa have a big fight before Eddard tells them they have to return to Winterfell. In the TV series, no fight occurs.
  • Eating the stallion's heart seems to be the only part of the Dothraki pregnancy ceremony kept in the TV series. In the book, there follows the procession around the sacred city.
  • In the book, the entire pregnancy ceremony is shown from her perspective as it is her POV chapter. In the TV series, the ceremony is shown more from Jorah and Viserys' perspectives, allowing for the additional scene that follows where Jorah catches Viserys trying to steal Daenerys' dragon eggs, stopping him. In the book, this attempt at theft is only mentioned.
  • In the TV series, Tyrion's confession is extended. In the book, he is stopped immediately, while in the series he continues for a bit with some funny examples of "crimes" he has committed.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene added between King Robert, Lancel, Lord Renly and Ser Barristan, showing Robert's hunt. Robert speaks of "good times" and "making the eight". Lancel is clearly shown goading Robert into drinking strong wine. In the book, this hunt is never seen, and Varys tells Eddard about the overly strong wine that Cersei provided to Lancel to give to Robert. The term "making the eight" never occurs in the book.
  • In the book, there is no mention of the Mad King, among the vicious attrocities he committed, that he ever murdered babies and women because the voices in his head told him they deserved it. 
  • In the TV series, Tywin is summoned to court to take responsibility for the crimes of Ser Gregor, his bannerman. This never happens in the book.
  • In the book, there is no scene between Theon and Ros, especially because Ros, as a character, doesn't exist in the book. The scene is the one depicting Ros leaving for King's Landing. In the book, no such scene takes place or is mentioned doing so.
  • There are several changes to Tyrion's trial by combat from book to series. In the TV series, it takes place in the Eyrie's High Hall by the opened Moon Door, immediately after Tyrion's confession. In the book, it takes place in the Eyrie's garden, the next morning. Beforehand, Catelyn tries to dissuade Lysa from going ahead with the trial by combat, arguing that Tyrion is no use to them dead. She also worries that Bronn will defeat Lysa's champion, having seen him fight against the hill tribes. In the TV series, Ser Vardis' death is more dramatic; he is injured numerous times before being stabbed through the neck, before finally being kicked through the moon door. In the book, he is stabbed in the chest as he falls to the ground. 
  • In the TV series, the Moon Door is an opening in the floor of the Eyrie's High Hall. In the books, the Moon Door is a weirwood door that stands between two pillars in Eyrie's High Hall.
  • In the book, in the feast where Viserys receives his "golden crown", two khals are present because their khalasars are also in Vaes Dothrak, and Drogo talks about Viserys to them. In the TV series, these khals are not present.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene where Tywin talks to Jaime about legacy in his tent while skinning a stag. In the book, this scene does not occur.
  • Tywin's description in the books differs from the TV series. In the book, he is described as bald with bushy golden side-whiskers and green eyes flecked with gold. In the TV series, he looks nothing like this.
  • In the book, Eddard arranges his confrontation with Cersei about Jaime in the Red Keep's godswood "so the gods can see" as he explained. In the TV series, the scene takes place in the courtyard instead. In the book, Cersei also tries to seduce Eddard, and slaps him when he spurns her advances. Cersei reveals that she never had a child by Robert, and that any child she had by him was when she had an abortion. Robert was both unaware of the pregnancy and the abortion.
  • When Eddard warns Cersei of his intentions in the book, he specifically advises her to leave for the Free Cities, or even further to the Summer Isles or the Port of Ibben. She calls his mercy a "bitter cup to drink from" but he counters that it is a "sweeter cup than your father served the Targaryen children." In the TV series, Eddard does not mention any of these places nor does he bring up the Targaryen children.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene in Littlefinger's brothel where he talks about his past while coaching Ros and another prostitute, Armeca. The character Armeca is also a TV series invention, as is the scene.
  • In the TV series, there is a scene between Theon and Osha. Maester Luwin then later comes in and asks Osha why wildlings are south of the Wall. This does not occur in the book.
  • In the TV series, a scene is added where Benjen's horse arrives at the Wall without its rider, which makes Castle Black worried. In the book, the men of the Night's Watch are only worried because of Benjen's long absence.
  • In the TV series, Eddard is told by Renly that something terrible has happened to Robert. In the book, Eddard only suspects something terrible has happened due to the dead silence on his way to King Robert's bedchamber.
  • In the TV series, Tomard, one of the guards at Winterfell, is sent with a letter by Eddard to Dragonstone to inform Stannis Baratheon that Robert has no rightful heirs, making next in line to the succession. In the book, Stannis investigated the bastards with Jon Arryn, and therefore already knew Jaime was the father of Robert's children.
  • Littlefinger goes into greater detail regarding trying to convince Eddard of Stannis's unsuitability to the throne in the book. According to Littlefinger, Stannis will purge the small council and refill it with his own loyalists and asserts that Stannis's ascent to the throne will mean war; Stannis will kill Cersei and her children to secure his claim to the throne (inciting Tywin and the houses sworn to Casterly Rock to war) and Stannis (unlike his brother, who forgave old enemies so long as they swore fealty to him) will also seek revenge against Mace Tyrell and Paxter Redwyne for the Siege of Storm's End and upon Balon Greyjoy; Littlefinger insists that anyone who fought on the wrong side during Robert's Rebellion or the Greyjoy Rebellion will have cause to dread Stannis becoming King.
  • In the TV series, Tomard is killed in the throne room before he can give the letter to Stannis.




     

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